‘Family Man,’ Illegal Alien Martinez-Maldonado Rapes 13-Year-Old Girl

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By Joe Guzzardi

Joe is a CAPS Senior Writing Fellow whose commentaries about California's social issues have run in newspapers throughout California and the country for nearly 30 years. Contact Joe at joeguzzardi@capsweb.org, or find him on Twitter @joeguzzardi19.

The writer's views are his own.

January 5, 2017

For all of the 30 years that I’ve been following immigration, the argument against building a wall or a fence on the Southwest border has been the same. If a ten-foot fence is built, sales of 11-foot fences will soar.

Like most of the arguments illegal immigration advocates advance, it’s nonsense. Building a fence is, at a minimum, worth a try. And U.S. law provides for it; see the 2006 Secure Fence Act. President-elect Trump might start on the border wall within the first days of his administration. Reuters reported last month that the Trump transition team asked the Department of Homeland Security to provide an evaluation of all the assets available to build a border wall and barrier construction.

More attuned to national security than the U.S., Israel is building a new fence, this one to protect it from ISIS terrorists, and fortifying an existing one.

Recently, the anti-fence arguments include another familiar refrain: nothing can deter families from reuniting. Topeka, Kansas, immigration lawyer David Trevino who is representing 38-year-old Tomas Martinez-Maldonado, an alien charged with raping a 13-year-old girl on a Greyhound bus, said that President-elect Donald Trump “can build a wall 100 feet high and 50 feet deep, but it is not going to keep family members separated. So if someone is deported and they have family members here ... they will find a way back – whether it is through the air, under a wall, through the coast of the United States.”

Illegal alien and accused child rapist Tomas Martinez-Maldonado
was voluntarily removed nine times, deported 10 times.

While most of Martinez-Maldonado’s family lives in Mexico, he has some Kansas relatives that Trevino described as “devastated.”

Martinez-Maldonado, who doesn’t sound like much of a family man to me, has been deported 10 times and voluntarily removed another nine times. Cosme Lopez, District of Arizona representative for the U.S. attorney’s office, declined comment to the Associated Press on why prosecutors twice dismissed felony reentry after deportation charges against Martinez-Maldonado in 2013 and 2015 in exchange for guilty pleas on misdemeanor entry charges.

Kansas U.S. Senator Jerry Moran gave AP the default comment: “There must be serious legislative efforts to address U.S. immigration policy, and we must have the ability to identify, prosecute and deport illegal aliens who display violent tendencies before they have an opportunity to perpetrate these crimes in the United States.”

The incoming Trump administration represents a real opportunity for Moran’s predictable statement to become a reality.

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