Another Country

Maria's picture

By Maria Fotopoulos

Maria is a CAPS Senior Writing Fellow who focuses on the impacts of growth on biodiversity. Find her on Twitter | in | FB.

The writer’s views are her own.


 

December 22, 2016

Increasingly, California does look like another country. It hews so far to extremes on immigration issues that it’s difficult to see how it can be reconciled with reasonable policies. So a Calexit, or California secession, from the United States to form a new country, as has been proposed, might not be that radical of an idea.

California’s leaders love illegal immigration, so the new country of California could fully embrace its Open Borders view, welcoming anyone from anywhere who can get here, with full knowledge of the fact that there are 7.5 billion people on the planet now, with 65.3 million of them displaced from their homes, and not an insignificant number of those would like to come to the U.S.

With all those California might welcome from around the world to join the state’s 2.4 million illegal aliens already living here, the new country might want to extend the welcome mat to those living throughout the United States illegally too. So add another 10 million or so. California could drive its population up to 100 million people in no time. Of course that would be no problem at all, because in the infinite wisdom and understanding of California’s leadership, there are no limits to growth and certainly the environmental impacts from tens of millions more people can be addressed through better conservation. You know, limit water use, ride mass transit, take reusable bags shopping, etc.

Okay. That couldn’t possibly happen, right? Well, perhaps not. Even the extremely liberal folks I speak with in the Bay Area and elsewhere in California have the belief in our Union deeply sewn into their core, despite their seeming rejection of the ideas of sovereignty and sound immigration policies.

L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti is joined by City Attorney Mike Feuer
and County Supervisor Hilda Solis to announce a $10 million fund
to help illegal aliens fight deportation.

Of course, then there’s the rest of the country; they might welcome Calexit after seeing how those supposedly representing the interests of Californians have continued for years to blur the distinction between citizens and illegal aliens, a slippery slope that ultimately impacts the entire country. CAPS has chronicled this in recent years, from the state granting illegal aliens driver’s licenses and permitting illegal aliens to practice law to protecting aliens from deportation and offering “sanctuary” to aliens in cities throughout the state. Then there are the educational and unemployment benefits and a variety of social services that California provides to those in the state illegally.

It doesn’t stop. Since Donald Trump won the Presidency on November 8, with immigration enforcement being a cornerstone of his campaign, California leaders have pushed back against the idea of restoring the integrity of the U.S. immigration system.

Did I say no stopping? Indeed. The pushback against sound immigration policy proposed by President-Elect Trump continued this week in California with the announcement from L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti of a $10 million legal defense fund for illegal aliens facing deportation. Called the L.A. Justice Fund, the city and county are funding it to the tune of $5 million, with the rest coming from philanthropic groups and the California Endowment, the state’s largest private healthcare foundation that works to expand health care for underserved individuals.

California is an ever-growing conundrum. Using public funds to defend people who are not in the country legally (that is, they shouldn’t be here to begin with, so we’re offering them legal defense to support them not being deported) just seems and sounds odd and incongruous – I have to summon the name of Kafka, again.

A tremendous misuse of funds too. A trip to skid row and even a cursory glance at the tremendous homelessness throughout the greater L.A. area should leave the average person scratching his head about priorities.

CAPS blog posts may be republished or reposted only in their entirety. Please credit CAPS as www.capsweb.org. CAPS assumes no responsibility for where blog posts might be republished or reposted. Views expressed in CAPS blog posts do not necessarily reflect the official position of CAPS.

Top