Cassandra Syndrome Today

Frosty Wooldridge's picture

By Frosty Wooldridge

Frosty is a speaker, author, environmentalist, patriot and teacher.

The writer's views are his own.

December 7, 2016

As a world bicycle traveler, you might refer to me as a Cassandra messenger. The Cassandra Syndrome derives from predictions of doom about a future few believe could occur, but upon later reflection turn out to be correct.

The term originated in Greek mythology. Cassandra, daughter of Priam, King of Troy, impressed the god Apollo with her beauty, so much so that he bequeathed her with the gift of prophecy. But when she rebuffed Apollo’s romantic advances, he placed a curse on her that nobody would believe her warnings. Cassandra warned the people of future events, but no one believed her. Once they came true, everyone suffered.

Today, the Cassandra Syndrome denotes a psychological tendency among people to disbelieve inescapably bad news, often through denial. The person making the prediction faces the dilemma of knowing future realities, but not being able to resolve them.

As a Cassandra messenger, I’ve seen what’s coming because I bicycled through it around the world.

Do most of America’s leaders understand the consequences of importing 100 million immigrants into our country within the next 30 years? Do they comprehend the environmental, quality of life and biosphere ramifications? Answer: Emphatically, NO!

Yes, the media reports every consequence of overpopulation – worldwide hunger, water shortages, species extinctions, wars for resources and catastrophic climate destabilization. But, overwhelmingly, world leaders don’t address overpopulation or attempt to connect the dots.

While reading many of the exceptional writers at CAPS, you understand our dilemma. Unfortunately, the rest of the world fails to comprehend the enormity of adding 3 billion people to this planet within 40 years – a blink in time. We expect another 138 million people in the USA, virtually all of it via immigration.

The United Nations estimates that 65 million refugees currently lack water, food, energy and homes, and look toward first world countries to migrate. The refugee numbers will grow to 150 million – and potentially to as high as 200 million – by 2050, just 34 years from now.

What Western Countries Face with Refugee Armada

Through mass immigration, Canada’s population today of 36 million is expected to reach 41 million by 2050. We know Canada as a “big” little country. That means that it’s “big” in landmass, but lacks ample arable land to grow crops. While its citizens have chosen 2.0 birth rates since 1970, its leaders force massive immigration onto Canada.

Europe currently is home to 742.5 million people. It encompasses 3.9 million square miles. It’s not much bigger than the United States at 3.1 million square miles. The United Kingdom houses 65 million people in a landmass less than the size of Oregon, but expects to add 11 million within 20 years via immigration. Germany, at 81 million, expects another 20 million in a landmass about the size of New Mexico.

Australia has a population of 24 million, but expects to reach 38 to 48 million by mid-century via mass immigration. It lacks water and arable land, but powerful developer interests force immigration onto that desert continent as if tomorrow will never arrive.

As you can imagine, immigration solves nothing. It stalls the inevitable for every Western country: ultimate collapse from overloading carrying capacity of every receiving country.

Goal: we need a national discussion and debate on the future of our civilization. It’s not going to happen by itself. That discussion-debate begins with you. Become a 21st century Cassandra with facts, figures and graphs to carry your message to your leaders.
 

Help start the discussion. Get some of the facts here.







 

Categories: 

CAPS blog posts may be republished or reposted only in their entirety. Please credit CAPS as www.capsweb.org. CAPS assumes no responsibility for where blog posts might be republished or reposted. Views expressed in CAPS blog posts do not necessarily reflect the official position of CAPS.

Top