Global Poll Reflects Universal Concern about Migration, Refugee Resettlement

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By Joe Guzzardi

Joe is a CAPS Senior Writing Fellow whose commentaries about California's social issues have run in newspapers throughout California and the country for nearly 30 years. Contact Joe at joeguzzardi@capsweb.org, or find him on Twitter @joeguzzardi19.

The writer's views are his own.

September 25, 2017
global refugee resettlement cartoon
A 25-nation majority skeptical about immigration, refugee resettlement.
With the Supreme Court poised to to hear the Trump administration’s refugee travel ban on October 10, with the RAISE Act bringing attention to the link between family-based migration and population growth, and with charges of racism or worse, hurled at Americans who want sensible immigration levels, a new poll merits close consideration.

Americans aren’t alone in wanting less immigration, and fewer refugees. An IPSOS poll taken among 18,000 citizens in 25 nations found that nearly half think that higher global migration has “negative consequences.” IPSOS describes itself as “curious about people, markets, brands and society. We deliver information and analysis that makes our complex world easier and faster to navigate and inspires our clients to make smarter decisions.”

Among the poll’s findings, 75 percent of the respondents say “the amount of migrants” in their country has increased; 44 percent agree that “immigration is causing my country to change in ways I don’t like,” but 25 percent disagreed. Almost half — 48 percent — said there were “too many new arrivals” in their nation while 21 percent disagreed. A majority worry about the effect of over-immigration on public services.

On refugee resettlement, six in 10 think terrorists pose as refugees, and four in 10 want their country’s borders closed.

In a concluding statement, the IPSOS managing director summed up the poll’s findings when he noted that regardless of the measure, more participants are negative than positive about immigration, and that the UK most heavily favors a points-based system similar to RAISE to determine who is allowed entry.

The RAISE Act, just beginning the congressional process, needs all the help it can get from the majority of American citizens who want less immigration and less crowding. Please go to the CAPS Action Alert page here to tell your Senators to support RAISE, and to slow immigration-driven population growth.
 
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