How does government silence a citizen? Tell him he doesn't count.

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By Inger Eberhart

Inger's political columns and essays have appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Marietta Daily Journal, The Social Contract Journal and other publications. Inger has appeared on My Fox Atlanta, 11 Alive, WSB-TV and has addressed state legislative committees, municipalities and Tea Party groups to educate Americans on the adverse effects of sustained mass immigration. Find her on Twitter @Hunter7Taylor.

The writer's views are her own.

November 20, 2011

"I hope all of you are going to fill out your census form when it comes in the mail next month. If you don't return the form the area you live in might get less government money and you wouldn't want that to happen, would you?" ~ Andy Rooney

Well, the Attorney General of Louisiana, James D. "Buddy" Caldwell does not necessarily want more government, he just wants the appropriate amount of government.  Mr. Caldwell has filed suit against the Secretary of Commerce, Census Bureau Director and the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives seeking to recover the congressional seat taken from Louisiana as a result of the 2010 Census.  Louisiana does not seek a recount of the 2010 Census, just a recalculation based upon legal populations.

The Census Bureau includes in its figures foreign nationals that are in the U.S. unlawfully and temporarily.  The Complaint states that to include those here unlawfully and temporarily "deprives the State of Louisiana of an additional Member of Congress to which the State is entitled and dilutes the strength of votes cast by individual Louisiana voters..."

In review, the 2010 Census forms do not contain an area where a person can identify him/herself as a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the U.S. Not only does the form not contain a check-box to self-identify as in the U.S. legally, but the 2010 Census Reference Book provides "Guidelines on who to count":

Under the "Foreign Citizens" subsection, it reads:

Do NOT include on your census form:

  • Citizens of foreign countries visiting the United States, such as on a vacation or business trip.

Do include on your census form:

  • Citizens of foreign countries living in the United States, so long as they are living and sleeping most of the time at the United States address on your form.
  • Citizens of foreign countries living in the United States, who are members of the diplomatic community, so long as they are living and sleeping most of the time at the United States address on your form.  That could be the embassy, consulate, United Nations facility, or other residences where diplomats live.  However, they have the right to refuse to provide any or all information.
  • Foreign students living in the United States while attending college in the U.S., so long as they live and sleep most of the time at the address on your form.

Under the "United States Citizens outside the United States" subsection, it reads:

Do NOT include on your census form:

  • U.S. citizens living outside the United States.

An Asian community fact sheet FAQ reads: "I’m not an American citizen. Do I have to participate in the 2010 Census? Everyone in the United States must be counted. This includes people of all ages, races, ethnic groups, citizens and noncitizens (including Visa students and green card holders). It is your duty to ensure you and your family are counted in the 2010 Census."

It is rather ironic that the Census Bureau implores that "it is your duty to ensure you and your family are counted in the 2010 Census." But, for those U.S. citizens living outside of the U.S., according to the Census Bureau, they don't count; therefore, they don't matter.

Through the use of illegal populations, the voting power and voting strength of legal residents is diluted.

Exhibit 2 of the Complaint alleges that when legal populations are used, that the representation and subsequent voting power would be as follows in the House of Representatives:

  • California would lose two seats (53 to 51),
  • Florida would lose one seat, (27 to 26)
  • Louisiana would gain one seat (6 to 7)
  • Missouri would gain one seat (8 to 9)
  • Montana would gain one seat (1 to 2)
  • North Carolina would gain one seat (13 to 14)
  • Ohio would gain one seat (16 to 17)
  • Texas would lose two seats (36 to 34)

The violation of immigration laws through schemes such as sanctuary cities, porous borders and inappropriate census counts impacts our sovereignty not only as a nation but also our voices as individuals.

References & resources:

Louisiana petitions to leave illegal immigrants out of 2010 census

Louisiana v. Bryson, et al.

Louisiana Office of the Attorney General

US Census Bureau

The US Census 2010

2010 Census form

10 Questions, 10 Minutes to help improve our community

2010 Census Questionnaire Reference Book

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