Musical Chairs

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By Michael W. Cutler

Mike is a Senior Fellow with CAPS and retired INS Senior Special Agent. During his 30-year career with the INS he rotated through all of the squads within the Investigations Branch. He was assigned to the Unified Intelligence Division of the DEA and for 10 years was assigned, as an INS Senior Special Agent, to the Organized Crime, Drug Enforcement Task Force. He has testified at numerous hearings conducted by committees and subcommittees of the House and Senate and provided testimony to the 9/11 Commission.

He hosts "The Michael Cutler Hour" on USA Talk Radio Fridays at 7 p.m. (EST) and is frequently interviewed by broadcast media on various aspects of immigration issues, especially the nexus to national security.

The writer's views are his own.

November 23, 2010
As children we all played the game of "Musical Chairs." A row of chairs was placed side to side with an additional row of chairs placed behind the row with their back facing each other.  As you likely recall there was enough chairs for all but one child and music was played as the kids marched around the rows of chairs.  As soon as the music stopped the children scrambled to find a chair to sit in.  Because there weren’t enough seats to go around for all of the children playing the game, the child who did not find a seat was out of the game and an additional chair was removed and the game proceeded.  Slowly the number of chairs and children were reduced by one until, at the end of the game two kids competed for the solitary chair.  The winner of the game was the child who, by game’s end, was seated. You may be wondering why I would be writing about this childhood game.  The answer is simple when you consider the high unemployment rate that has so much damage to our nation and to our citizens and their families.  Without a job people and families cannot support themselves.  When there is a loss of jobs the situation is comparable to the game of Musical Chairs that I described above--too many workers and not enough jobs to go around just as in the game there were too many kids and not enough seats to go around. Could you imagine what would happen if during the playing of Musical Chairs if more kids were suddenly sent into the room to join the others already there while not increasing the number of seats available for the contestants? Think of how the children's sense of justice would be offended and, remember, this is just a game we would be talking about. Now imagine if this sort of situation developed in the job market which has become the adult version of Musical Chairs.  There are far too few jobs and far too many workers desperate to be hired to support themselves and their families.  Suddenly they find out that the political leaders who are supposed to represent them and their fellow Americans are proposing to add more job seekers to the already bleak job market. This is precisely what members of the Congress are now proposing in the so-called "lame duck" session. Harry Reid who barely held his seat in the United States Senate and witnessed the dwindling of the power wielded by the Democratic Party in the Senate and the loss of control of the House of Representatives, the so-called "People's House" in a political rout of historical proportions is joining with the soon to be former Speaker of the House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi in talking about their intentions to pass the DREAM Act the Monday after Thanksgiving! The DREAM Act is a legislative Trojan Horse that uses deceitful language, playing on the generosity and kindness of the American people.  The DREAM Act is an acronym for Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act.  In point of fact, the House version of the bill would permit aliens to participate in the program who had not attained their 35th birthday by the date of the passage of this legislative nightmare while the Senate version of the bill has absolutely no age cut off whatsoever.  Furthermore, both bills in previous versions had generous waiver provision meaning that factors which might disqualify an alien who would apply for participation in this program could be waived or ignored!  The stated priority of the most recent version of this bill would be to take humanitarian concerns and issues involving family unity into account.  Yet the DREAM Act is being portrayed as a bill to help "young immigrants." In what culture or nation is someone who is 34 years of age considered a "minor"? Think about how many aliens would be petitioned for by alien relatives who would participate in the program. The term alien is defined by the Immigration and Nationality Act as simply being any person who is not a citizen or national of the United States.  Open borders advocates have universally complained the term "alien" is an unfair term that de-humanizes people.  Of course this is a fatuous argument, but it has become a standard complaint.  Incredibly the DREAM Act makes ample use of the term alien because that word is necessary if the word "Dream" was to be used to describe the legislation--a word that is being used to refer to the American Dream, a dream that is tragically all but gone for so many of our fellow Americans in this difficult and dangerous era.
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