The Muslim Ban that Wasn't

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By Inger Eberhart

Inger's political columns and essays have appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Marietta Daily Journal, The Social Contract Journal and other publications. Inger has appeared on My Fox Atlanta, 11 Alive, WSB-TV and has addressed state legislative committees, municipalities and Tea Party groups to educate Americans on the adverse effects of sustained mass immigration. Find her on Twitter @Hunter7Taylor.

The writer's views are her own.

February 2, 2017

“A liar knows that he is a liar, but one who speaks mere portions
of truth in order to deceive is a craftsman of destruction.”

                                                                                      – Criss Jami

 
No truer evidence of this can be found than in the week’s protests of the “Muslim ban.” The splendor of the protests is only outshone by the breathtaking lack of critical thinking by the masses. I’ll convince you in five points:

1. How many countries are mentioned in the Executive Order?
The Executive Order that has many in an uproar is titled “Protecting the nation from foreign terrorist entry into the United States.” The Order remains in effect for 90 days. It specifically mentions one country, Syria. The remaining countries to which the Order applies (Iran, Iraq, etc.) are listed, specifically, by DHS.

2. Who is tasked with keeping America safe?
The FBI, CIA, DHS, State Department and other alphabet-soup security agencies are responsible for keeping America safe. I can say, with confidence, that DHS working in conjunction with the other alphabet agencies identified these seven countries likely based on data from previous administrations. DHS houses Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs & Border Patrol (CBP). These agencies are responsible for border security and immigration.

3. Are there not more than seven Muslim countries?
There are many Muslim majority nations from which foreign nationals are allowed to enter the U.S., such as Egypt, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Turkey, Kuwait, Qatar and many more. You get the idea.

4. Why aren’t stable Muslim nations admitting their colleagues as refugees?
Nothing more on this one. Just ask yourself the question.

5. Prior to 2017, had a ban been implemented?
Yes. A November 20, 2013, news report from ABC News stated the following:

“Several dozen suspected terrorist bomb makers, including some believed to have targeted American troops, may have mistakenly been allowed to move to the United States as refugees, according to FBI agents investigating the remnants of roadside bombs recovered from Iraq & Afghanistan…The discovery in 2009 of two al Qaeda-Iraq terrorists living as refugees in Bowling Green, Kentucky – who later admitted in court that they’d attacked US soldiers in Iraq…As a result of the Kentucky case, the State Department stopped processing Iraq refugees for six months in 2011...even for many who had heroically helped U.S. forces as interpreters and intelligence assets...An intelligence tip led the FBI to Ward Ramadan Alway in 2009. He claimed to be a refugee who faced persecution back home – a story that shattered when the FBI found his fingerprints on a cordless phone base that U.S. soldiers dug up in a gravel pile south of Bayji, Iraq on Sept 1, 2005. The phone base had been wired to unexploded bombs buried in a nearby road.”

Is there a Muslim ban?
No. The U.S. admits more than 1.5 million legal immigrants each year. Muslim immigration to the U.S. increased 22 percent from 2010 to 2015. In 2016, almost half of the 85,000 refugees who entered the U.S. were Muslim, according to the State Department’s Refugee Processing Center.

In just five short points, I’ve shown you that there is no Muslim ban and that restrictions have been implemented previously, as well as why the action was taken, with good reason.

I linked all this information from original sources. Why wouldn’t an international media outlet (CNN) adrift in a sea of resources not do the same?

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