Trump Hits the Ground Running with Direct Action on Immigration

Frosty Wooldridge's picture

By Frosty Wooldridge

Frosty is a speaker, author, environmentalist, patriot and teacher.

The writer's views are his own.

January 30, 2017

Speaking from the Oval Office in his first weekly radio address broadcast January 28, President Donald J. Trump said, “This administration has hit the ground running at a record pace…. We’re doing it with speed and we’re doing it with intelligence … on behalf of the American people.”
 
The President’s first week was indeed action-packed with more than 20 Executive Orders (EOs), Presidential Memoranda and Proclamations. Included in the actions welcomed by those who have advocated for years for immigration enforcement are:

  • Scrapping the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement with Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. Trump said the U.S. could now negotiate one-on-one deals that would protect American workers. TPP would have opened up the U.S. to more immigration.

    Week I: President Trump signs executive orders related to immigration.
  • Increasing border security by deploying all lawful means to secure the southern border of the U.S., including the construction of a wall that is “monitored and supported by adequate personnel so as to prevent illegal immigration, drug and human trafficking, and acts of terrorism.”

  • Repatriating “illegal aliens swiftly, consistently and humanely.”

  • Hiring of 5,000 additional Border Patrol agents.

  • Compiling a detailed report of all direct and indirect government assistance to Mexico for the last five years.

  • Ending “catch and release” policies to “prosecute and deport” illegal aliens.

  • Enhancing interior security by hiring an additional 10,000 immigration officers to enforce laws.

  • “Ensuring that jurisdictions that fail to comply with applicable Federal law do not receive Federal funds, except as mandated by law.” (Targeted to pressuring sanctuary cities.)

  • Building “transparency and situational awareness of criminal aliens” by collecting and sharing data on immigration status of those incarcerated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons and those in state prisons and local detention facilities.

An EO on Friday generated hysteria and protests at several airports over the weekend. The EO suspends issuance of visas and other immigration benefits for 90 days to nationals from countries compromised by terrorism. Countries include Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The EO stated:

“In order to protect Americans, the United States must ensure that those admitted to this country do not bear hostile attitudes toward it and its founding principles. The United States cannot, and should not, admit those who do not support the Constitution, or those who would place violent ideologies over American law. In addition, the United States should not admit those who engage in acts of bigotry or hatred (including ‘honor’ killings, other forms of violence against women, or the persecution of those who practice religions different from their own) or those who would oppress Americans of any race, gender, or sexual orientation.”

Friday’s EO also suspends refugee admissions for 120 days in order to establish “extreme vetting procedures before allowing more refugees from warn-torn regions.”

The protests that book-ended the President’s first week may become the standard if the “resist” movement continues to get fuel. So even as Trump powers through making good on his campaign promises, strong opposing forces are digging in their heels and making a lot of noise. Thus, it’s no time to let up on telling your legislators that you support sound programs to ensure that the U.S. immigration system has integrity. Contact your legislators and ask them to support E-Verify and to act promptly on immigration proposals.

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