CAPS Blog - Leon Kolankiewicz

Ever-Growing Human Demands Stress Biosphere: The Case of Fertilizers, Livestock Production and Dead Zones

The BBC reports that a recent scientific study in the journal Nature Communications indicates that global food production requires a “significant” boost in fertilizer use to meet exponentially rising demands from population growth and more meat-and-dairy intensive diets. Yet this call comes at the same time other scientists have found that biogeochemical flows of nitrogen and...

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Georgie Anne Geyer: Journalist with a heart…and a brain

Georgie Anne Geyer In a journalism career now spanning more than half a century, Chicago native Georgie Anne Geyer has worked as a reporter, foreign correspondent and syndicated columnist. She also has been a pioneer in a traditionally male profession. Geyer is one of the few prominent journalists – Bonnie Erbé of PBS’s program To the Contrary and...

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2,000 Years of Global Growth in 6 Minutes

The NGO Population Connection (formerly Zero Population Growth or ZPG) has produced an outstanding, visually arresting 6-minute video that graphically dramatizes the population explosion humanity and our Earth have experienced in the last two centuries. Actually, the video shows 2,000+ years of demographic history, but during most of that time little appears to happen. It is only after 1800 (the...

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New Report Ignores Leading Cause of Environmental Degradation in U.S. – Population Growth

The Huffington Post reports that the 2016 Environmental Performance Index (EPI), compiled by distinguished experts at two ivory tower Ivy League institutions – Columbia and Yale – ranks the United States a lackluster 26th out of 180 countries. The 62-page report rates countries according to various indices of how well they conserve “ecosystem vitality” and nurture “...

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Population Ignored Yet Again; This Time at Recent Paris Talks

Every human being on Earth emits carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs), both directly and indirectly. Every time each of the 7.4 billion of us alive today exhales – trillions of daily exhalations in aggregate – we add a tiny net increment of CO2 to the atmosphere because of the physiological process of respiration in which all animals (and plants too) engage. For...

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Climate Gone Crazy

Epic California Drought Just One Manifestation of Weather Out of Whack If a picture is worth a thousand words, then perhaps 200 pictures are worth a book, or at least a blog post. The Los Angeles Times has posted a dramatic “infographic” of more than 200 images of California drought maps from 2011 to 2015 that vividly depict the progression or descent of the Golden State into the...

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Desperate Chinese Are Buying Bottles of ‘100% Pure Rocky Mountain Air’

The smog really is that bad in Beijing…and India’s cities too  Like many overcrowded, bursting cities in developing countries around the world, China’s capital Beijing has a notorious smog problem that has only worsened in recent years as the numbers of people, smokestacks and vehicles have all surged, resulting in a staggering increase in emissions of air pollutants....

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Aldous Huxley on Overpopulation

Brave New World author warned of threat in 1958 Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) as a young man. Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is most remembered as the author of the haunting, dystopian novel Brave New World, published back in 1931. This iconic work is one of the two most recognized (and unheeded) “cautionary tales” of the 20th century, the other of course being...

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Remembering Douglas Rainsford Tompkins, 1943-2015

Global Conservation Cause Loses a Giant to South American Kayaking Accident Douglas Rainsford Tompkins, 1943-2015 Doug Tompkins was Ohio-born and New York-bred but a Californian at heart. The former entrepreneur and mogul – founder and cofounder of two highly profitable, fashionable companies, The North Face and Esprit – was a passionate outdoorsman and...

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Dust in the Wind: Audacious ‘Desert Wheat’ Scheme Wilts in Sands of Saudi Arabia

With depletion of fossil aquifer used for irrigation, cultivating wheat in Saudi Arabia’s desert proves just another pipe dream. Flush with hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue from its humongous oil exports several decades ago, and understandably uneasy about its utter dependency on grain and food imports to feed one of the fastest growing populations in the world, Saudi Arabia...

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