environment

environment

Two Peas in a Pod – Jerry Brown and Barack Obama on Climate Change

You’ve got to hand it to Governor Jerry Brown and President Barack Obama for at least one thing: they each have heaps of chutzpah, though critics might call it effrontery.

The guv and the prez have the gall to cast themselves as crusading heroes on climate change – hobnobbing with hip celebrities and basking in accolades from the likes of Bill Maher, Arianna Huffington and Leonardo DiCaprio – even as they promote mass immigration and massive U.S. population growth that will inevitably sabotage national-level efforts to reign in America’s carbon dioxide emissions.

Obama, Oil, Climate Change, Population and Immigration

How Immigration-Driven Population Growth Converted the Climate President into the Oil President

In Tribute to Late Population Activists and Friends – Al Bartlett, Joyce Tarnow, Leon Bouvier, Alan Kuper, Gaylord Nelson, Garrett Hardin and K.R. Hammond

Having been immersed in the U.S. population stabilization movement for a couple of decades or more, I have had the great honor and privilege of meeting, collaborating with and befriending a number of outstanding people. These are individuals whose intelligence, eloquence, intellectual integrity, courage and steadfast commitment to a cause vilified by many and forgotten by most have inspired me profoundly.

In Memory of Martha – The Last of Her Kind

Today, September 1, 2014, marks a century to the day that a legendary species of bird perished from the face of the earth. Martha, the very last surviving passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), died in the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1, 1914. And with her death, the passenger pigeon officially went extinct.

Twilight Zone? Onset of the Earth’s Sixth Mass Extinction

One profligate species causes demise of thousands

Over its storied 3.8-billion year history, the long-running epic called Life on Earth has suffered five major setbacks, called mass extinction events. In a mass extinction, not just species, but entire taxa – genera, families and orders – can be swept away into oblivion, leaving behind only a smattering of fossils as mute testimony to their ephemeral presence on our planet.

Today is World Elephant Day

Today is World Elephant Day. Sunday was World Lion Day. Frankly, every day could be given over to recognizing an animal, because we must do more to build awareness of what man is doing worldwide to destroy our rich biodiversity. Simultaneously, we must work to stop more losses and then reverse the trends.

Southwestern States Guzzling Groundwater till it’s Gone

UC Irvine and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) scientists have published a new study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters that for the first time documents and quantifies the appalling depletion of groundwater in the Colorado River Basin.

Humans Squishing Bugs

Invertebrates pulverized by one species of vertebrate

We wildlife conservationists are in the habit of playing up the threat posed by humans to “charismatic” species like the giant panda, gorillas, whales, dolphins, polar bears and elephants.

What do all of these creatures have in common? They are all large mammals like us, and they all have cute babies like we do.

On Our Innumeracy

When I blog, it will be almost exclusively about the United States, one of the three most overpopulated nations.

That is due to our high numbers – third only behind China and India – our huge environmental footprint and that sleek, new side-by-side refrigerator I bought last spring.

Diamonds (and Human Impacts) Are Forever: The Long-Lived Consequences of Growth

A “long time” depends on perspective – to an impatient child it’s measured in minutes, to a historian in decades or centuries, and to the geologist in millennia. The size of humanity and our corresponding scale of influence have grown to the point where we are now a “geologically significant” force. As you might guess, our long-term influence on the planet is not for the better. We are causing a mass extinction.

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